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Exhibitions

A Timeline of Yasuo Kuniyoshi's Major Exhibitions and Prizes

April–May, 1917

First Annual Exhibition of Society of Independent Artists

Had his first public exhibition when two of his works, Modern Crucifix (now known as Crucifixion) and Homeward (both 1917; location unknown), were included in First Annual Exhibition of Society of Independent Artists, held at Grand Central Palace at Lexington Avenue and 46th Street, New York

1921

Daniel Gallery

Had his first affiliation with Daniel Gallery on West 47th Street, New York, when it exhibited two of his pictures; the gallery would represent him for the next ten years

1926

Quote from Review: “Tumblers from Abroad,” New York Times

“The present writer has always felt for the work of Yasuo Kuniyoshi a tremendous admiration. His paintings and especially his drawings are gracious to the eye and stimulating to the intelligence. Kuniyoshi is himself in everything he does. He seems to have been untouched alike by the lyric painting of the East and by the architecture of [Paul] Cezanne, which has influenced so many of his contemporaries. Even the color is his own.”

1927

Whitney Studio Club

Included in Whitney Studio Club’s traveling exhibition

February 11, 1928

Quote from Review: Henry McBride, New York Sun

“The Daniel Gallery has opened a retrospective exhibition of Yasuo Kuniyoshi’s work. This artist is one of the most outstanding of the younger group of Americans and the one who, because of a certain strangeness in the style, would be most likely to attract critical attention in Europe, but who—and just because of this strangeness—gets less backing from American collectors than he deserves. A sequence of paintings illustrating all parts of Kuniyoshi’s comparatively short career is, therefore, something to be looked into.”—Henry McBride, “A Kuniyoshi Retrospective,” New York Sun, February 11, 1928; reprinted in The Flow of Art: Essays and Criticisms of Henry McBride (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1997), 239

December 14, 1929

Quote from Review: Henry McBride, New York Sun

“The other artists are all well known and constantly discussed in these columns. The one among them who calls especial attention to himself is Yasuo Kuniyoshi, who sends the most ambitious picture he has yet achieved to this exhibition. It is a life sized study of a model sprawling upon a couch. It is inescapable in the room in which it is shown. . . . I find it amazingly vigorous and full of too many special accomplishments in painting to be recited here in detail. It may suffice to say that it alone justifies the idea of an American museum of contemporary art and its permanent place is obviously in such an institution.”—Henry McBride, “Work of Nineteen Best American Artists Exhibited in New Museum’s Second Show,” New York Sun, December 14, 1929, 8

1929

Quote from Review: New Yorker

“We were slow to come to the insistent beauty of Kuniyoshi, finding something not only alien but alienating in his statement of life through a limited range of color. But now that we have become converted we are willing to go the whole way and shout Hallelujah with the best of them. He is one of the few real painters this generation has produced. In our state of new-found salvation, we feel sorry for all those who have not seen the light and the way. We are even a little intolerant of those who cannot shout as loudly as we do.”—“Ad Astra per Kuniyoshi,” New Yorker, 1929

December–January, 1929–1930

The Museum of Modern Art

Was included in Paintings by 19 Living Americans, the second exhibition of the newly opened Museum of Modern Art, New York

1930

Quote from Review: Citation in scrapbook

“Mr. Kuniyoshi paints with such apparent pleasure, such gusto, that his work is continually outstandingly refreshing. He is among the multitude of bright and engaging painters [who] flourish today, a distinguished addition to any company of modernists.”—Citation in scrapbook, “Cr. Art? 1930?”

1930

Quote from Review: Samuel M. Kootz, Modern American Painters

“Each fresh revelation of Mr. Kuniyoshi’s painting abilities only serves to convince me that he is one of our finest moderns.”—Samuel M. Kootz, Modern American Painters (New York: Brewer & Warren, 1930), 10

March–April, 1930

Daniel Gallery

Had his last solo show at Daniel Gallery before Charles Daniel would close his gallery the following year

October–December, 1930

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 29th Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Department of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute (now Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute), Pittsburgh

October, 1931

Meiji Confectionary Company

Had solo show of lithographs at Meiji Confectionary Company, Okayama City, Japan, sponsored by Chugoku Minpo Press

October–December, 1931

Carnegie Institute

Received Honorable Mention for Odd Objects on a Couch (1930; location unknown) in 30th Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

October–December, 1931

Art Institute of Chicago

Was included in 44th Annual Exhibition of American Paintings and Sculpture, Art Institute of Chicago

October–January, 1932–1933

The Museum of Modern Art

Was included in American Painting and Sculpture, 1862–1932, The Museum of Modern Art

November–January, 1932–1933

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

February, 1933

Downtown Gallery

Had first solo exhibition at Edith Halpert’s Downtown Gallery, New York

October–December, 1933

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 31st Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

December–January 1933–1934

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Sculpture, Watercolors and Prints, Whitney Museum of American Art

January–February, 1934

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Received Temple Gold Medal for Fruit on Table (location unknown) in 129th Annual Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

October–December, 1934

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 32nd Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

November–January 1934–1935

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in Second Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum of American Art

October–December, 1935

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 33rd Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

January–February, 1936

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in Second Biennial Exhibition, Part I—Sculpture, Drawings and Prints, Whitney Museum of American Art

March–April, 1936

Downtown Gallery

Had solo show at Downtown Gallery

November–December, 1936

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in Third Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum of American Art

April, 1937

American Artists’ Congress

Was included in First Annual Membership Exhibition, American Artists’ Congress, New York

October–December, 1937

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 35th Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

November–December, 1937

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum of American Art

May–July, 1938

Musée du Jeu de Paume

Was included in Trois Siècles d’Art aux États-Unis, Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris

October–December, 1938

Carnegie Institute

Was included in 36th Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

February–March, 1939

Baltimore Museum of Art

Was included in Six Living Artists, Baltimore Museum of Art

February–November, 1939

Santa Barbara Museum of Art

Received First Prize for Weathervane and Objects on a Sofa (1933; Santa Barbara Museum of Art, California) in the American Section of the Golden Gate International Exposition, San Francisco

October–December, 1939

Carnegie Institute

Received Second Prize for Lay Figure (1937–38; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis) in 37th Annual International Exhibition of Paintings, Carnegie Institute

March–April, 1940

Downtown Gallery

Was included in Retrospective of Lithographs, 1922–39, Downtown Gallery

February, 1942

The Arts Club of Chicago

Was included in Nine American Artists, The Arts Club of Chicago

October–December, 1943

Carnegie Institute

Was included in Painting in the United States, Carnegie Institute

January–February, 1944

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Received J. Henry Scheidt Memorial Prize for End of Juanita (1942; Brooklyn Museum, New York) in 139th Annual Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

March–April, 1944

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

Received Purchase Prize for Nevadaville (1942; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond) in Fourth Biennial Exhibition, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

October–December, 1944

Carnegie Institute

Received First Prize for Room 110 (1944; location unknown) in Painting in the United States, Carnegie Institute

November–December, 1944

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was included in Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum of American Art

February–March, 1945

Carnegie Institute

Was included in Portrait of America, Carnegie Institute

October–December, 1945

Carnegie Institute

Was included in Painting in the United States, Carnegie Institute

October–January, 1945–1946

Art Institute of Chicago

Received Norman Wait Harris Bronze Medal for Headless Horse Who Wants to Jump (1945; Ohara Museum, Kurashiki, Japan) in 56th Annual American Exhibition of Paintings, Art Institute of Chicago

June–July, 1946

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Was included in Advancing American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

October–December, 1947

Carnegie Institute

Was included in Painting in the United States, Carnegie Institute

December–January, 1947–1948

Riverside Museum

Received Fifth Prize for Look, It Flies! (1946; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC) in Second Exhibition of La Tausca Art Competition, Riverside Museum, New York

March 27–May 9, 1948

Whitney Museum of American Art

Was the first living artist to be honored by a retrospective exhibition at the Whitney Museum since its founding in 1931. Yasuo Kuniyoshi: Retrospective Exhibition, a show of eighty-five paintings and forty-six lithographs, was organized by Lloyd Goodrich, associate curator, who also wrote the catalog text.

December–February, 1950–1951

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Received Third Prize for Fish Kite (1950; Fukutake Collection, Okayama, Japan) in American Painting Today: A National Competitive Exhibition, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

May–October, 1952

Venice Biennale

Was one of four artists (with Alexander Calder, Stuart Davis, and Edward Hopper) to represent the United States at the Venice Biennale

December, 1952

Downtown Gallery

Was included in Stuart Davis and Yasuo Kuniyoshi Paintings Exhibited at the 1952 Venice Biennale, Downtown Gallery

June–October, 1953

The Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art held Yasuo Kuniyoshi and Niles Spencer Memorial Exhibition in memory of Kuniyoshi, who died May 14, 1953, and Spencer, who died May 15, 1952.